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Last Christmas (it was only three weeks ago – seems like forever!) was the bi-annual get together with Mr Stoatie’s side of the family and so we set off with the dogs, for a weeks holiday at Romaldkirk in County Durham.

We stayed in a converted barn in a holiday let complex just off one of the three village greens. The village itself is very picturesque, even in the dismal winter weather and must be a honeypot in the summer. For the first few days we had relentless rain and strong wind, then Christmas Day we had a glimpse of blue skies between the squalls, and finally some crisp frosty weather for the remainder of the week.

There used to be a railway line through the village run by the Tees Valley Railway which has since been converted into a public footpath. There’s an interesting site here which tells you all about it.  In a break with tradition it was decided that the Family Walk (along the old railway line) would take place before The Presents and The Dinner.

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With an elderly dog, and having been ill myself, I had an ideal excuse to head back when the freezing hail and strong wind got too uncomfortable. Mr Stoatie and the eldest daughter nobly offered to accompany me! For the entire time we were out this rainbow remained in the sky.

Romaldkirk Kirk

Some parts of the Church date back to Anglo Saxon period, although it’s believed that the Scots laid waste to most of it a few years after the Norman invasion. Unsurprisingly it’s dedicated to St Romald who was born in Northamptonshire in 650AD, I’m not sure how he came to be venerated up here. It’s said that Romald (or Rumwald) was a grandson of King Penda, the great Mercian king whom I’ve a bit of a soft spot for – he was one of the last pagan kings!

Kirk Inn

Romaldkirk Green

Romaldkirk is only ten minutes away from Barnard Castle. When we were courting Mr Stoatie and I had spent a couple of weeks camping nearby and had visited the Bowes Museum there. My abiding memory was watching the swan automaton so we took the eldest daughter with us to relive the experience. The swan is only wound once a day, to help preserve the mechanism, and it’s truly magical. It used to cost a guinea to see the swan a few years after it was manufactured in 1773 and was quite a crowd puller by all accounts. In this age of CGI it’s hard to imagine how awe inspiring this would have been in those days.

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The museum, which was purpose built to house the collection of the Bowes family, is a beautiful building, styled, rather incongruously, as a French chateau and is packed with art, fine furniture and costumes. It’s well worth a visit.

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Bowes Museum

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The barn.

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Mr Stoatie and I managed to get out by ourselves for a couple of hours on Boxing Day and took the dogs for a walk around the nearby Grassholme Reservoir. It was absolutely perishing, with a really stiff wind pelting us with hail every so often. Even the ducks looked fed up.

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The farmland around the holiday lets was used for stabling and there was a constant stream of cars going past each morning and evening. Some of them drove so fast through the yard that I was worried the dogs and I would get run over in the dark. The grey pony above was given hard feed and a hay net, but when it’s owner left, the sheep from the next field used to get in under the wire fence on the other side and help themselves!

The little Shetland pony below was alone in a tiny field, about the same size as our garden. It was fed regularly but I felt sorry for it, the ground was almost completely poached. Does the poor thing get taken out for walks? (Not while we were there anyway) Isn’t this the equine equivalent of keeping a goldfish in a bowl?

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